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                    [post_date] => 2018-11-19 07:07:41
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-19 12:07:41
                    [post_content] => NAPA and SONOMA COUNTIES, CA – The American Red Cross of the California Northwest has at its disposal a new, redesigned emergency-response vehicle to serve local communities, including Napa and Sonoma counties, during disasters.

Red Cross emergency-response vehicles are on the frontline during disasters, delivering food and supplies, often to families cut off from other services, officials said.

The design of the new vehicle was overhauled from the chassis up, making this version more nimble when encountering difficult terrain and debris, along with WiFi that enables volunteers to complete critical casework at disaster scenes, two larger feeder windows, external lighting to light dark sites, and a sliding lift-system making it easier to load supplies.

"It was a pleasure to take the Emergency Response Vehicle out to Bodega Bay for their emergency preparedness town meeting at the fire house," Red Cross driver Kelly Bradshaw said. "The Emergency Response Vehicle is beautiful, and it was a joy to share it with the residents. We were able to share some of the important services it's designed to facilitate."

The vehicle was funded by The Hedco Foundation, The Bothin Foundation, Wells Fargo Foundation, PG&E Corporation Foundation, Paul Cleveland & Deborah Lawson, US Bank National Association, Ms. Kathryn Holmes, Kaiser Permanente, American AgCredit FLCA, The Shapiro Family Trust, many other local donors, and those who supported the Fund the Need at the 2018 Heroes event, officials said.

Read more: New Red Cross State-Of-Art Emergency Vehicle Stands Ready
                    [post_title] => New Red Cross State-Of-Art Emergency Vehicle Stands Ready
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                    [post_date] => 2018-07-09 07:34:19
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-09 11:34:19
                    [post_content] => When the budget has been approved to purchase and build an apparatus, it is time for the apparatus purchasing committee (APC) to meet. The APC is dynamic in nature, which means that it may include driver/operators, officers, paramedics (if the specification will be ALS capable), chief officers, an internal purchasing representative, an IT representative, and an emergency vehicle technician (EVT). An ideal APC has no more than eight and no fewer than three individuals.

The committee is a dedicated group that analyzes changes in the department, manufacturing processes, technological innovations, and apparatus and equipment safety, while remembering their fiduciary responsibilities. The apparatus committee chair is the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) and sets the direction and goals for the committee throughout the process.

Staying focused

When tasked with purchasing or building a new apparatus, the APC must review the vendor qualifications to establish a solid working relationship with the dealer, factory engineers, parts availability, warranty, and that the vendor provides “Best in Class” customer service. With all the new technology, the AHJ must be sure to underscore to the vendor that the department will be using this apparatus for many years to come, so it must be operationally functional, reliable and safe.

Part of the process is the rumor control. Some committee members may share a snippet of the process and suddenly the chief’s vehicle transforms into a heavy rescue and three tillers! Nonetheless, now is the time for the AHJ to step in and meet with the committee members, managing rumor control in the department, while staying focused on the direction of the current process.

Also, there may be an emotional component to the APC. For example, let’s say the APC has created an emergency warning lighting specification for the new apparatus that requires a “well-lighted and safe custom apparatus with enough emergency lighting to protect the crews while blocking on the highway.” During the mid-build visit, differing opinions arise among the APC members based on personal preference, experience, tenure, position, etc. This is when the AHJ must remind the committee of the original lighting specification they helped draft. Even though discussion about the lighting package is healthy, they must stay the course with the initial specifications. Committee members won’t always agree, and pet peeves and stubbornness can stall the process, which is when the AHJ must consider the concept of needs vs. wants.

Most departments have APCs that work very well together and fulfill their duty admirably. Other departments may not have this luxury, and will need to hire a consultant. Committee members often come to the table with their lists of personal whims, wishes and desires that may become controversial in the process. As such, a conscientious AHJ is responsible for developing a charter that will keep members in check. Once a charter is developed and deployed, the AHJ has guidelines to monitor and direct all personalities and establish committee-level priorities. That in itself may be more challenging than agreeing on a make and model and apparatus color.

Read more: Apparatus Supplement: The Power of the APC 
                    [post_title] => Apparatus Supplement: The Power of the APC 
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                    [post_modified] => 2018-07-07 21:44:58
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-08 01:44:58
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                    [post_date] => 2018-06-23 07:49:38
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-23 11:49:38
                    [post_content] => A new emergency vehicle is designed to provide better aid at the scene and help keep patients out of the hospital.

West Metro Fire Rescue’s new ambulance, the ARM, or Advanced Resource Medic, has special equipment to diagnose and treat more types of illnesses and injuries.

Before this type of emergency vehicle, the only option was to transport patients to the emergency room. Now, if the patient’s symptoms allow it, first responders will be able to treat them where they are and help them recover at home.

Our ARM car (Advanced Resource Medic) is on duty today, and the crew just went on their first call.  It’s a new type of patient care- an ambulance that DOESN'T take you to the hospital. Instead, patients are treated at home, or at work.

Read more: New Emergency Vehicle To Diagnose, Treat More Patients At Scene

 
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                    [post_date] => 2018-06-19 07:44:26
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-19 11:44:26
                    [post_content] => Most fire departments don’t have the luxury of redundancy in their vehicle fleet — when a fire truck goes down, it can cause a crisis, not only for that department’s community but also for neighboring ones that may depend on it for mutual aid.

But fire trucks are about to get “smarter” allowing for quicker, easier fixes and less chance of prolonged down time.

That’s the result of a collaboration between Microsoft and IDEX, which specializes in fire and safety products and has been supplying these vehicle products for decades.

IDEX supplies the networks and products on the emergency vehicle and, on the new Captium platform with Microsoft’s IoT product, aggregates those in a way that allows real-time communication of a problem on the vehicle.

One of the key components of the Internet of Things, in this case, is the ability to take a series of sensors and embed them in an emergency vehicle, such as a fire truck, and take “dumb” devices and make them smart, said Rick Zak, director of Justice and Public Safety Solutions for Microsoft.

It wasn’t a reengineering of the dumb parts of the emergency vehicle, it was developing a link for all those parts on a platform to get information off of the vehicles in real time, said Jeff Zook, marketing manager for Connected Solutions at IDEX Fire and Safety.

“Maintenance is the No. 1 priority,” said George Ehalt of the Aurora, Colo., Fire Rescue. “A system that will track preventive maintenance schedules, identify mechanical issues before they become larger problems and detect trends associated with repairs … Aurora would like a system that can notify key people that a problem has occurred.”

“You press a button a on a fire truck to engage a pump and something doesn’t work properly, the natural response is, ‘That truck’s bad, let’s pull it out of service,’” Zook said. “Now if you press that button and something doesn’t work properly you look at your laptop or phone and can see the solution.”

Zak called it “adding a layer of smart” to the components already present on an emergency vehicle. “We didn’t have to redesign pumps and valves to add a layer of smart into each rig. The platform captures and shares this information and ties these devices together to be able to aggregate a data set in the cloud and provide analytical tools,” Zak said.

“We’re bringing intelligence to all these products on networks that sit on these emergency vehicles so when something goes wrong, the first thing we’re providing is a way for [people] to see what the problem is,” Zook said.

Zook said as cities have less of a budget for reserve vehicles, there is more pressure to keep them in good working order. “The world has changed,” he said. “When cities had larger budgets, they had reserve vehicles and when a vehicle went down, they’d get a reserve vehicle and take the one that went down and put it in the shop.”

Zook said that two providers of emergency vehicles are set to include the platform on all emergency vehicles chassis in July. “You’ll start to see the vehicles roll out after July,” he said.

Read more: Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer 
                    [post_title] => Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer
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                    [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 22:56:40
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                    [post_date] => 2018-04-12 07:15:27
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-12 11:15:27
                    [post_content] => Passavant Area Hospital’s gift of an advanced life support vehicle to Jacksonville Fire Department could save the city thousands of dollars in equipment purchases.

Jacksonville Fire Chief Doug Sills said Monday that Passavant intends to give an advanced life support vehicle — along with all of its equipment — to the fire department, no strings attached.

“If we had to put a price tag on the gift from Passavant Area Hospital, if you were going to buy all this stuff, we’d be looking right at $100,000,” Sills said. “The cardiac monitor is probably a $30,000 price tag; the vehicle itself is probably between $40,000 and $45,000, so it’s a pretty significant gift.”

Passavant will end its paramedic services on Saturday after the Illinois Department of Public Health denied its license renewal. Jacksonville Fire Department will pick up many of the paramedic response calls the hospital would have serviced.

Read more: Passavant to give emergency vehicle to city

 
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                    [post_modified] => 2018-04-10 02:24:45
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                    [ID] => 13549
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2018-03-01 07:44:36
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-01 12:44:36
                    [post_content] => Monterey >> It’s ultra-sleek, uber-safe, and fitted to specs.

A state-of-the-art emergency response vehicle is being custom-built for the local American Red Cross chapter and should arrive in 9-12 months. The vehicle will replace one of the three older emergency vehicles that are currently being used in Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz counties and will be better outfitted to serve the needs of potential local disasters, said Michele Averill, CEO of the Red Cross of the Central Coast.

Coming on the heels of one of the worst natural disaster years in California’s history, the $250,000 piece of equipment will be the first “next generation” emergency response vehicles in the Central Coast region. Its purchase has been made possible by donations spearheaded by the regional property and casualty insurer, Capital Insurance Group, which contributed $70,000.

“I was thrilled, so grateful, I couldn’t wait to share the news with the volunteers,” said Averill, “They’re the ones getting up in the middle of the night (driving these trucks) to deal with disasters.” In 2017, the local Red Cross chapter responded to nearly 150 local disasters, most of which involved one of its three emergency response vehicles.

Read more: Local Red Cross getting an emergency vehicle upgrade 
                    [post_title] => Local Red Cross getting an emergency vehicle upgrade
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                    [post_modified] => 2018-02-18 20:55:27
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-02-19 01:55:27
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                    [ID] => 13365
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2017-12-21 07:03:18
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 12:03:18
                    [post_content] => The Painesville Township Fire Department recently welcomed two new emergency vehicles to Station No. 3.

The rescue squad, which was recently placed in service, is a unique blend of a new engine and the “box” of the old unit.

Fire Chief Frank Huffman said the former 2006 Ford 6-Liter Diesel Squad had multiple engine problems and became costly to repair.

“It was basically a remodel,” Huffman said. “ We bought a brand new chassis (2017 V10 gasoline) and put the old box on the new frame. We did it all under $50,000.”

Firefighter Shawn Forster, who served as the lead mechanic, said it was truly team effort.

“The whole department really helped out on this,” he said.

The firefighters did all the labor in about six weeks, which was a major cost savings.

The price for a new Squad is estimated to be $205,000, but the department was able to complete the entire job for just around $40,000, saving the township and residents over $160,000, according to the Painesville Township Fire Department’s Facebook post.

The post also said that they expect to get another 10 years of front-line service out of that vehicle, with an additional five years of backup service following that.

Station No. 3 also recently got another front-line service vehicle.

As a result of receiving a Federal Emergency Management Agency for the Assistance to Firefighters Grant for more than $600,000, the department recently received a new aerial truck — also called a ladder truck.

Huffman said they applied for the grant because the department’s previous truck failed its annual inspection.

Read more: Painesville Township Fire Department gets new emergency vehicles 
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                    [post_modified] => 2017-12-23 17:16:21
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-23 22:16:21
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                    [post_date] => 2017-11-14 07:44:23
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-14 12:44:23
                    [post_content] => Buying a new vehicle can be an expensive process, but when that vehicle os an ambulance, it's even more pricey. Thankfully, it's an expense one local hospital doesn't have to worry about.

Although they have long since passed, Kent and Mary Steadley are still making a huge impact on the community they called home. Back in the late '60s the Carthage, Missouri couple set up a trust fund that has touched thousands of lives. The latest example is the brand new ambulance that was blessed prior to going into service in the Mercy EMS Carthage fleet.

Bob Patterson, Director of Emergency Services for Mercy, says the $156,000 dollar vehicle has a number of state-of-the-art safety features that will benefit both the patient inside as well as the person taking care of them.

Bob Patterson, Mercy Emergency Services Director: "There's two specific seats that our crew members can operate in, they both have what we call four point restraints or four point harnesses that allow them access to the patient so they can continue to do their job while secured in their seat."

Jack Crusa, Steadley Trust Advisory Board: "The first grant was in 1972, and since then it's given over $25 million dollars."

Mercy,McCunne Brooks is one of many community causes that have benefited from the Steadley Trust. And Crusa says this isn't even the first time trust dollars have benefited the hospital. They helped pay for upgrades in the Imaging Department, namely an MRI machine.

Jack Crusa, Steadley Trust Advisory Board: "What this embodied was great healthcare for Carthage and the people near Carthage, and that's what they would want us to continue to support."

Read more: Mercy Hospital receives new emergency vehicle 
                    [post_title] => Mercy Hospital receives new emergency vehicle 
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                    [post_modified] => 2017-11-21 22:51:52
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                    [post_date] => 2017-11-11 07:31:33
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-11 12:31:33
                    [post_content] => All too often, first responders are hit by cars and killed or injured while stopped along the road providing emergency care. Fortunately, an inventor from Davie, Fla., has decided to pursue an idea that would prevent such tragedies.

He developed the patent-pending S.A.F.E. (SAFETY APPARATUS FOR EMERGENCY VEHICLES) to improve the visibility of stopped emergency vehicles on the road. In other words, it provides additional impact protection. As such, it has the potential to save lives and prevent injuries and property damage. Furthermore, it is designed to absorb the impact if the emergency vehicle is struck from behind. Finally, while it’s readily accessible when needed, it is positioned out of sight and out of the way when not in use.

The inventor’s personal concerns inspired the idea. “Whenever I either heard an account of an emergency vehicle involved in an accident or personally saw first responders at the scene of an emergency, I was concerned for their safety,” he said. “I wanted to find a way to protect them as they do their jobs.”

Read more: Protective Upgrade Invented for Emergency Vehicles (HLW-1821)
                    [post_title] => Protective Upgrade Invented for Emergency Vehicles (HLW-1821) 
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                    [post_date] => 2017-10-12 07:33:23
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-12 11:33:23
                    [post_content] => Excellance, Inc., a family-owned manufacturer of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Alabama, has completed another Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) unit for Bossier City Fire Department. Bossier City’s switch to CNG has saved over $7,000 per vehicle in fuel costs annually. Excellance’s CNG vehicles get up to 7 miles a gallon, compared to 3½ miles on a standard diesel truck.

As reported by EMS World, CNG units burn cleaner, so they’re great for the environment but they are also great economically, boasting significantly lower fuel costs compared to standard gasoline and diesel engines.

Cities that are rich in compressed natural gas or that have CNG fueling potential may be eligible to receive custom units like Bossier City’s soon.

Bossier City Fire Dept - 2016 Ford F-650 CNG ambulanceExcellance successfully completed the development, design and construction of the world’s first Ford QVM approved CNG ambulance in 2014. This CNG powered ambulance, also custom-built for the City of Bossier City Fire Department in Louisiana, features a medium-duty

Ford F-650 chassis with lower fueling costs, saving a minimum of 50% over gas and diesel powered engines.
In February 2016, Bossier Chief of EMS, Jeff Watson, explained the city’s rationale for switching to CNG service units: “There are different ones [EMS vehicles] out there that use bi-fuels which run off gas [gasoline] for a little while and run off of CNG. Ours are totally CNG and they are totally dependent on it. The generator runs off CNG and the actual motor runs off CNG. From our city’s perspective, ambulances are one of the busiest vehicles and used the most fuel in the city and that is why they wanted to make sure that we start using those as soon as we could.”

Read more: Another CNG-Powered Emergency Vehicle for Bossier 
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            [post_content] => NAPA and SONOMA COUNTIES, CA – The American Red Cross of the California Northwest has at its disposal a new, redesigned emergency-response vehicle to serve local communities, including Napa and Sonoma counties, during disasters.

Red Cross emergency-response vehicles are on the frontline during disasters, delivering food and supplies, often to families cut off from other services, officials said.

The design of the new vehicle was overhauled from the chassis up, making this version more nimble when encountering difficult terrain and debris, along with WiFi that enables volunteers to complete critical casework at disaster scenes, two larger feeder windows, external lighting to light dark sites, and a sliding lift-system making it easier to load supplies.

"It was a pleasure to take the Emergency Response Vehicle out to Bodega Bay for their emergency preparedness town meeting at the fire house," Red Cross driver Kelly Bradshaw said. "The Emergency Response Vehicle is beautiful, and it was a joy to share it with the residents. We were able to share some of the important services it's designed to facilitate."

The vehicle was funded by The Hedco Foundation, The Bothin Foundation, Wells Fargo Foundation, PG&E Corporation Foundation, Paul Cleveland & Deborah Lawson, US Bank National Association, Ms. Kathryn Holmes, Kaiser Permanente, American AgCredit FLCA, The Shapiro Family Trust, many other local donors, and those who supported the Fund the Need at the 2018 Heroes event, officials said.

Read more: New Red Cross State-Of-Art Emergency Vehicle Stands Ready
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  • 77 Circle Freeway Dr Cincinnati, OH 45246-1298
  • 513-874-0700

Category: "Emergency Vehicle"