WP_Query Object
(
    [query] => Array
        (
            [tag] => emergency-vehicles
        )

    [query_vars] => Array
        (
            [tag] => emergency-vehicles
            [error] => 
            [m] => 
            [p] => 0
            [post_parent] => 
            [subpost] => 
            [subpost_id] => 
            [attachment] => 
            [attachment_id] => 0
            [name] => 
            [static] => 
            [pagename] => 
            [page_id] => 0
            [second] => 
            [minute] => 
            [hour] => 
            [day] => 0
            [monthnum] => 0
            [year] => 0
            [w] => 0
            [category_name] => 
            [cat] => 
            [tag_id] => 1941
            [author] => 
            [author_name] => 
            [feed] => 
            [tb] => 
            [paged] => 0
            [meta_key] => 
            [meta_value] => 
            [preview] => 
            [s] => 
            [sentence] => 
            [title] => 
            [fields] => 
            [menu_order] => 
            [embed] => 
            [category__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [category__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_name__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [tag_slug__in] => Array
                (
                    [0] => emergency-vehicles
                )

            [tag_slug__and] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__in] => Array
                (
                )

            [author__not_in] => Array
                (
                )

            [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
            [suppress_filters] => 
            [cache_results] => 1
            [update_post_term_cache] => 1
            [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
            [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
            [post_type] => 
            [posts_per_page] => 10
            [nopaging] => 
            [comments_per_page] => 50
            [no_found_rows] => 
            [order] => DESC
        )

    [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [taxonomy] => post_tag
                            [terms] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => emergency-vehicles
                                )

                            [field] => slug
                            [operator] => IN
                            [include_children] => 1
                        )

                )

            [relation] => AND
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                    [0] => qns_term_relationships
                )

            [queried_terms] => Array
                (
                    [post_tag] => Array
                        (
                            [terms] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => emergency-vehicles
                                )

                            [field] => slug
                        )

                )

            [primary_table] => qns_posts
            [primary_id_column] => ID
        )

    [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
        (
            [queries] => Array
                (
                )

            [relation] => 
            [meta_table] => 
            [meta_id_column] => 
            [primary_table] => 
            [primary_id_column] => 
            [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [clauses:protected] => Array
                (
                )

            [has_or_relation:protected] => 
        )

    [date_query] => 
    [queried_object] => WP_Term Object
        (
            [term_id] => 1941
            [name] => Emergency vehicles
            [slug] => emergency-vehicles
            [term_group] => 0
            [term_taxonomy_id] => 1941
            [taxonomy] => post_tag
            [description] => 
            [parent] => 0
            [count] => 4
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [queried_object_id] => 1941
    [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  qns_posts.ID FROM qns_posts  LEFT JOIN qns_term_relationships ON (qns_posts.ID = qns_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  qns_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (1941)
) AND qns_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (qns_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR qns_posts.post_status = 'acf-disabled') GROUP BY qns_posts.ID ORDER BY qns_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10
    [posts] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 14456
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2018-06-19 07:44:26
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-19 11:44:26
                    [post_content] => Most fire departments don’t have the luxury of redundancy in their vehicle fleet — when a fire truck goes down, it can cause a crisis, not only for that department’s community but also for neighboring ones that may depend on it for mutual aid.

But fire trucks are about to get “smarter” allowing for quicker, easier fixes and less chance of prolonged down time.

That’s the result of a collaboration between Microsoft and IDEX, which specializes in fire and safety products and has been supplying these vehicle products for decades.

IDEX supplies the networks and products on the emergency vehicle and, on the new Captium platform with Microsoft’s IoT product, aggregates those in a way that allows real-time communication of a problem on the vehicle.

One of the key components of the Internet of Things, in this case, is the ability to take a series of sensors and embed them in an emergency vehicle, such as a fire truck, and take “dumb” devices and make them smart, said Rick Zak, director of Justice and Public Safety Solutions for Microsoft.

It wasn’t a reengineering of the dumb parts of the emergency vehicle, it was developing a link for all those parts on a platform to get information off of the vehicles in real time, said Jeff Zook, marketing manager for Connected Solutions at IDEX Fire and Safety.

“Maintenance is the No. 1 priority,” said George Ehalt of the Aurora, Colo., Fire Rescue. “A system that will track preventive maintenance schedules, identify mechanical issues before they become larger problems and detect trends associated with repairs … Aurora would like a system that can notify key people that a problem has occurred.”

“You press a button a on a fire truck to engage a pump and something doesn’t work properly, the natural response is, ‘That truck’s bad, let’s pull it out of service,’” Zook said. “Now if you press that button and something doesn’t work properly you look at your laptop or phone and can see the solution.”

Zak called it “adding a layer of smart” to the components already present on an emergency vehicle. “We didn’t have to redesign pumps and valves to add a layer of smart into each rig. The platform captures and shares this information and ties these devices together to be able to aggregate a data set in the cloud and provide analytical tools,” Zak said.

“We’re bringing intelligence to all these products on networks that sit on these emergency vehicles so when something goes wrong, the first thing we’re providing is a way for [people] to see what the problem is,” Zook said.

Zook said as cities have less of a budget for reserve vehicles, there is more pressure to keep them in good working order. “The world has changed,” he said. “When cities had larger budgets, they had reserve vehicles and when a vehicle went down, they’d get a reserve vehicle and take the one that went down and put it in the shop.”

Zook said that two providers of emergency vehicles are set to include the platform on all emergency vehicles chassis in July. “You’ll start to see the vehicles roll out after July,” he said.

Read more: Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer 
                    [post_title] => Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => smart-emergency-vehicles-rolling-out-this-summer
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 22:56:40
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-13 02:56:40
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.mooreindhardware.com/?p=14456
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => post
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [1] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 13365
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2017-12-21 07:03:18
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 12:03:18
                    [post_content] => The Painesville Township Fire Department recently welcomed two new emergency vehicles to Station No. 3.

The rescue squad, which was recently placed in service, is a unique blend of a new engine and the “box” of the old unit.

Fire Chief Frank Huffman said the former 2006 Ford 6-Liter Diesel Squad had multiple engine problems and became costly to repair.

“It was basically a remodel,” Huffman said. “ We bought a brand new chassis (2017 V10 gasoline) and put the old box on the new frame. We did it all under $50,000.”

Firefighter Shawn Forster, who served as the lead mechanic, said it was truly team effort.

“The whole department really helped out on this,” he said.

The firefighters did all the labor in about six weeks, which was a major cost savings.

The price for a new Squad is estimated to be $205,000, but the department was able to complete the entire job for just around $40,000, saving the township and residents over $160,000, according to the Painesville Township Fire Department’s Facebook post.

The post also said that they expect to get another 10 years of front-line service out of that vehicle, with an additional five years of backup service following that.

Station No. 3 also recently got another front-line service vehicle.

As a result of receiving a Federal Emergency Management Agency for the Assistance to Firefighters Grant for more than $600,000, the department recently received a new aerial truck — also called a ladder truck.

Huffman said they applied for the grant because the department’s previous truck failed its annual inspection.

Read more: Painesville Township Fire Department gets new emergency vehicles 
                    [post_title] => Painesville Township Fire Department gets new emergency vehicles
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => painesville-township-fire-department-gets-new-emergency-vehicles
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2017-12-23 17:16:21
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-23 22:16:21
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.mooreindhardware.com/?p=13365
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => post
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [2] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 13281
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2017-11-11 07:31:33
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-11 12:31:33
                    [post_content] => All too often, first responders are hit by cars and killed or injured while stopped along the road providing emergency care. Fortunately, an inventor from Davie, Fla., has decided to pursue an idea that would prevent such tragedies.

He developed the patent-pending S.A.F.E. (SAFETY APPARATUS FOR EMERGENCY VEHICLES) to improve the visibility of stopped emergency vehicles on the road. In other words, it provides additional impact protection. As such, it has the potential to save lives and prevent injuries and property damage. Furthermore, it is designed to absorb the impact if the emergency vehicle is struck from behind. Finally, while it’s readily accessible when needed, it is positioned out of sight and out of the way when not in use.

The inventor’s personal concerns inspired the idea. “Whenever I either heard an account of an emergency vehicle involved in an accident or personally saw first responders at the scene of an emergency, I was concerned for their safety,” he said. “I wanted to find a way to protect them as they do their jobs.”

Read more: Protective Upgrade Invented for Emergency Vehicles (HLW-1821)
                    [post_title] => Protective Upgrade Invented for Emergency Vehicles (HLW-1821) 
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => protective-upgrade-invented-emergency-vehicles-hlw-1821
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2017-11-14 15:26:44
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-14 20:26:44
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.mooreindhardware.com/?p=13281
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => post
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [3] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 7201
                    [post_author] => 3
                    [post_date] => 2017-08-12 07:47:59
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-12 11:47:59
                    [post_content] => NORTHAMPTON, Mass. (WWLP) – A Chicopee Police officer was cited for failing to stop at a red light, after an accident this weekend.

22News found out what you need to know and do when an emergency vehicle is approaching.

Under state law, if an emergency vehicle is approaching you from ahead or behind, you have to get out of the way, quickly.

“Slow down and put my blinker on and pull over to the side of the road,” Sophie Chavon of Northampton told 22News.

That’s what you do if police, a fire truck or an ambulance approaches you with lights flashing on the road.

Yield, and stay far behind them after they pass. Don’t try to follow too closely.

“Like people who will like pull over and then speed up right behind and use it to cut thru traffic,” Chavon said.

That’s against the law.

Read more: Emergency vehicles on the road: what are the rules? 
                    [post_title] => Emergency vehicles on the road: what are the rules? 
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => emergency-vehicles-road-rules
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2017-08-12 18:25:10
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-12 22:25:10
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.mooreindhardware.com/?p=7201
                    [menu_order] => 0
                    [post_type] => post
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

        )

    [post_count] => 4
    [current_post] => -1
    [in_the_loop] => 
    [post] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 14456
            [post_author] => 3
            [post_date] => 2018-06-19 07:44:26
            [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-19 11:44:26
            [post_content] => Most fire departments don’t have the luxury of redundancy in their vehicle fleet — when a fire truck goes down, it can cause a crisis, not only for that department’s community but also for neighboring ones that may depend on it for mutual aid.

But fire trucks are about to get “smarter” allowing for quicker, easier fixes and less chance of prolonged down time.

That’s the result of a collaboration between Microsoft and IDEX, which specializes in fire and safety products and has been supplying these vehicle products for decades.

IDEX supplies the networks and products on the emergency vehicle and, on the new Captium platform with Microsoft’s IoT product, aggregates those in a way that allows real-time communication of a problem on the vehicle.

One of the key components of the Internet of Things, in this case, is the ability to take a series of sensors and embed them in an emergency vehicle, such as a fire truck, and take “dumb” devices and make them smart, said Rick Zak, director of Justice and Public Safety Solutions for Microsoft.

It wasn’t a reengineering of the dumb parts of the emergency vehicle, it was developing a link for all those parts on a platform to get information off of the vehicles in real time, said Jeff Zook, marketing manager for Connected Solutions at IDEX Fire and Safety.

“Maintenance is the No. 1 priority,” said George Ehalt of the Aurora, Colo., Fire Rescue. “A system that will track preventive maintenance schedules, identify mechanical issues before they become larger problems and detect trends associated with repairs … Aurora would like a system that can notify key people that a problem has occurred.”

“You press a button a on a fire truck to engage a pump and something doesn’t work properly, the natural response is, ‘That truck’s bad, let’s pull it out of service,’” Zook said. “Now if you press that button and something doesn’t work properly you look at your laptop or phone and can see the solution.”

Zak called it “adding a layer of smart” to the components already present on an emergency vehicle. “We didn’t have to redesign pumps and valves to add a layer of smart into each rig. The platform captures and shares this information and ties these devices together to be able to aggregate a data set in the cloud and provide analytical tools,” Zak said.

“We’re bringing intelligence to all these products on networks that sit on these emergency vehicles so when something goes wrong, the first thing we’re providing is a way for [people] to see what the problem is,” Zook said.

Zook said as cities have less of a budget for reserve vehicles, there is more pressure to keep them in good working order. “The world has changed,” he said. “When cities had larger budgets, they had reserve vehicles and when a vehicle went down, they’d get a reserve vehicle and take the one that went down and put it in the shop.”

Zook said that two providers of emergency vehicles are set to include the platform on all emergency vehicles chassis in July. “You’ll start to see the vehicles roll out after July,” he said.

Read more: Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer 
            [post_title] => Smart Emergency Vehicles Rolling Out This Summer
            [post_excerpt] => 
            [post_status] => publish
            [comment_status] => closed
            [ping_status] => closed
            [post_password] => 
            [post_name] => smart-emergency-vehicles-rolling-out-this-summer
            [to_ping] => 
            [pinged] => 
            [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 22:56:40
            [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-13 02:56:40
            [post_content_filtered] => 
            [post_parent] => 0
            [guid] => http://www.mooreindhardware.com/?p=14456
            [menu_order] => 0
            [post_type] => post
            [post_mime_type] => 
            [comment_count] => 0
            [filter] => raw
        )

    [comment_count] => 0
    [current_comment] => -1
    [found_posts] => 4
    [max_num_pages] => 1
    [max_num_comment_pages] => 0
    [is_single] => 
    [is_preview] => 
    [is_page] => 
    [is_archive] => 1
    [is_date] => 
    [is_year] => 
    [is_month] => 
    [is_day] => 
    [is_time] => 
    [is_author] => 
    [is_category] => 
    [is_tag] => 1
    [is_tax] => 
    [is_search] => 
    [is_feed] => 
    [is_comment_feed] => 
    [is_trackback] => 
    [is_home] => 
    [is_404] => 
    [is_embed] => 
    [is_paged] => 
    [is_admin] => 
    [is_attachment] => 
    [is_singular] => 
    [is_robots] => 
    [is_posts_page] => 
    [is_post_type_archive] => 
    [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 85479236656b9e578ae1295fa9f915b9
    [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 
    [thumbnails_cached] => 
    [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => 
    [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array
        (
            [0] => query_vars_hash
            [1] => query_vars_changed
        )

    [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array
        (
            [0] => init_query_flags
            [1] => parse_tax_query
        )

)
  • 77 Circle Freeway Dr Cincinnati, OH 45246-1298
  • 513-874-0700

Posts Tagged: "Emergency vehicles"